0

Your Basket

Photo Essay: 100 Sculptors of Tomorrow

Posted on 10 Sep 2019

Take a look at the exciting new sculptures from '100 Sculptors of Tomorrow', the book that celebrates and sculpture and opens the definition of the medium.

Jebila Okongwu, Banana Sculpture No. 17 (2013), Banana Boxes, fishing line, foam, resin and wood, 180x184x62cm.

His works come from a Native African perspective using rubbish and ubiquitous disregarded banana boxes in order to elevate them to new forms. They are both lowbrow and highbrow and comment on the imposition of a first world upon third world countries.

Holly Hendry, Just Offal (2018), Plaster, Jesmonite, Marble, Aluminium, Pigment, Ash, Iron Oxides and Stainless Steel Fixings, 163x76x5cm.

At first glance her work resembles Brutalist structures; self-contained and hard-edged; however, a closer inspection reveals their true nature. The artist is interested in anatomy, botany and architecture – her works are composed of plaster, marble, aluminium, pigment, and steel. They are bodily but also altogether man-made.

Francis Upritchard, Marianne (2016), Steel and Foil Armature, Paint, Modelling Material and Papier Mache, 50x40x35cm.

Francis Upritchard’s practice deals with both historical artefacts and displaced narratives.

Nathan Mabry, Heavy Handed (2013), Weathering Steel, 210x150x120cm.

Nathan’s work references ethnographic art with pop culture and modern artistic movements such as Minimalism. He references art historical modes with a fun and monumental approach.

Ramesh Mario Nithiyendran, Mud Men (2016), Earthenware, Glaze, Gold Lustre, MDF, Cardboard, Acrylic, Enamel and Parcelain, dms variable.

His work is a completely zany conversation between various cultures (and religions) His work aims to create a completely new mode of representation by contrasting creation myths between religion and their differing representation of the body.

Shane Darwent, Future Bryte (2016), Custom Fabricated Storefront Awnings and Flourescent Lighting, 370x300x430cm.

Shane Darwent decontextualises and re-contextualizes ubiquitous architectural forms as a type of high art.

Tulio Pinto, Nadir No. 8 (2014), Steel Ladder, Glass, Rope and Stones, 204x260x80cm.

His work is totally formal and absolutely technical and deals with the laws of physics. These works are about balance and physics and forces us to think about our own mortality in a way.

Chris Bogia, Windowsill Watcher (2018), Wood, Veneer, Yarn, Grasscloth, Paint and Lacquer, 99x58cm.

A retro-stylized LGBT approach that uses basic materials and elevates them to a very modernist form

Leonardo Ulian, Atlas 02 - The Observer (2014), Copper Wire, Micro Chips and Books, 181x36x41cm.

His practice focuses on reconfiguring religious symbols such as the mandalas through previously used technological parts. His works are both meticulous and labour intensive, which suggests a wariness of the future.

Caroline Achaintre, Mad Cap (2017), Hand Tufted Wool, 270x204cm.

Caroline’s work is painting, as textile as sculpture.

Sebastian Neeb, Trophy For Being Where Everyone Else Is (2017), Gilded Ceramic, Stone, Veneer, Martble, Plywood, and Car Paint, 65x31x31cm.

Sebastian’s work is mobile, satirical and pokes fun at art generally.

Zadie Xa, Bio Enhanced/Hiero Advanced The Genius of Gene Jupiter (2018), Hand Sewn and Machine Stitched Assorted Fabrics with synthetic hair on bamboo, 166x170cm.

Her work comes from a feminist reinterpretation of Native American customs and culture and her work is centred on otherness and her personal experience within the Asian diaspora.
Holly Hendry, Just Offal (2018), Plaster, Jesmonite, Marble, Aluminium, Pigment, Ash, Iron Oxides and Stainless Steel Fixings, 163x76x5cm. first glance her work resembles Brutalist structures; self-contained and hard-edged; however, a closer inspection reveals their true nature. The artist is interested in anatomy, botany and architecture – her works are composed of plaster, marble, aluminium, pigment, and steel. They are bodily but also